CW1 &amp

CW3Reggae has always been associated with Rastafarianism, a culture where people wear dreadlocks hair covered with woollen hats in green, gold and red colours (Blake, 1997). Origin of Reggae Most of reggae’s original versions can be found in Mento, Ska and Rocky Steady. Reggae changed the original traditional patterns when they allowed guitar to play off-beat chords, while the bass guitar played melodic patterns (Waters, 1985). Music in the society was used to explain to the rest of the world the oppressions that the citizens were going through. The extreme pressures of lack of jobs, good houses and political unrest was becoming a menace at Kingston. This made many Rastafarians and singers to get into Rastafarianism as a way of escaping from the injustices that were being experienced in the society. Popular artists such as the wailers, Burning Spear, Bob (Andy), Gregory Isaacs, Culture and Marcia (Griffiths), became popular during this era and they all turned into Rastafarianism as a way of life (Knight Martnez-Vergne, 2005). Reggae music had also an impact to the politics of Jamaica. The opposition leader at one time spoke of how the message in the music is interwoven with politics and it’s a good avenue where information can be passed from one generation to another. Thus music and politics cannot be separated. Since reggae evolved in the 60’s, it has become among the most listened to music genres as the culture that is contained in it is really appreciated. Bob Marley and the Wailers are the biggest sellers of the gene ever and their hit Exodus was voted the best and most influential album of the twentieth century. Musicians and groups such as. Black Uhuru, Gregory Isaacs, UB40, Maxi Priest, Shabba Ranks, Super Cat Shaggy, Buju Banton, Chaka Demus Pliers, Beenie, Bounty, Sean Paul, TOK among others are the most influential artists that are spreading the music genre to many generations. They have earned a lot of cash and fame globally, an aspect that was not imagined to ever happen in the world of music (Longhurst, 2007). Impacts of Reggae in modern society The modern society is full of many social, political and economic issues. Music plays a greater role in spreading important information about what happens in any given societies. Gospel music, spreads the good news of God, patriotic songs talks about the love of one’s country, reggae music too has a message to pass to the rest of the world. Main themes that are found in most reggae songs are equality, justice, poverty, marriage, sex, drugs politics, religion among other many types of themes that the music spreads all over the world. It has been liked by most international audiences who views most African culture as being rich and of important lessons to their day to day lives (Potter, 1988). For a better understanding of the themes and message that the music brings forth, it is important to closely examine an artist who is commonly recognised as the father of reggae and Rastafarianism in Jamaica. The music of the late Bob Nesta Marley who introduced reggae music to international perspectives can be termed to combine a feel good of rhythm with militant call for justice and freedom from oppression. He was born in Jamaica’s countryside, but later moved to at a young age to Trench Town, Kingston, one of Jamaica’s most hopeless towns that one could imagine of living in. He abandoned school and left